Smoking With Wood – The SmoFried Guide

Charcoal ChimneyWhenever wood smoke fills the air you can almost garnet that it will attract a crowd. Whether that crowd wants in on the food or they’re just their simply to watch. There is something unmistakingly unique about one of the if not the most primitive methods to prepare food. Even after thousands of technological advances in the culinary field over the years there is still a premium feel when it comes to food prepared over hot fire and smoke. There is no kitchen utility that can recreate the robust flavor a burning log can give you. Smoke in the liquid form pails in comparison to the authentic and full bodied flavor you get from a live smoldering hickory log.

The easiest and most efficient way to ignite hardwood is to place it over an already burning bed of charcoal. Use a Weber Charcoal Chimney to get the charcoal ignited. Simply place one full sheet of newspaper beneath the bottom portion of the charcoal chimney and fill the top portion with your favorite charcoal. Use a long match to light the newspaper and give the chimney about twenty minutes and all of the charcoal should be ready to use. Pour the charcoal in the desired area and place a few wood chunks or logs on top. Wait until the wood is smoldering without flame before you begin cooking. Heavy white smoke will impart an overpowering and unsavory flavor on your food.


Apple Wood

AppleGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Mild
-Fruity
-Sweet

 

 

 

 

Almond Wood

AlmondGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Sweet
-Nutty

 

 


Bourbon Barrel Wood
Bourbon BarrelGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Heavy Smoke
-Bourbon Flavor
-Nutty

 

 


Cherry Wood
CherryGet It Here!

-Medium Heat
-Low Smoke
-Mild
-Fruity

 

Hickory Wood

HickoryGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Sweet
-Bold

 

Maple WoodMapleGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Mild
-Sweet

 

 

Mesquite Wood

MesquiteGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Earthy
-Spicy

 

 

Oak WoodOakGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Heavy Smoke
-Mild
-Nutty

 

 

 

Orange WoodOrangeGet It Here!

-Medium Heat
-Low Smoke
-Tangy
-Mild

 

 

Peach WoodPeachGet It Here!

-Medium Heat
-Low Smoke
-Mild
-Sweet

 

Pecan WoodPecanGet It Here!

-High Heat
-Low Smoke
-Sweet
-Spicy

 

Walnut WoodWalnut

-High Heat
-Heavy Smoke
-Bold
-Slightly Bitter

 

 


Using Hardwoods to Smoke Food

Smofried Big Green Egg

There are three different types of hardwoods available to smoke foods with. They are chips, chunks and logs. Chips are scraps and shavings that are leftover from the processing of the other two types of woods. Chips have a propensity to be very dry. They will typically ignite and burn fast. To obfuscate the speed at which wood chips burn you’ll want to soak them in water for a few hours before you begin cooking. Wood chips are useful within a small smoke box in a gas grill or in a conjunction with charcoal on a standard kettle grill.

The next step up from wood chips are wood chunks. Wood chunks are distinguishable by their fist sized nature. Due to the density of wood chunks there is no need to soak them in water. Once the chunks are ignited they will typically burn for anywhere between one and five hours.

Wood logs are typically full pieces of wood. Sometimes logs may be quartered but they are most useful in pits with offset smoke boxes. Logs may take a while to become fully ignited but once at full capacity they will typically burn for at least four hours. Wood logs impart the most authentic bbq flavor due to the high levels of smoke they produce.

 


Hardwood Smoke Strength:

Mild Woods: Medium Woods: Heavy Woods:
Apple Almond Mesquite
Cherry Hickory Walnut
Orange Maple  
Peach Oak  
  Pecan  
  Bourbon Barrel  

 Meat & Wood Preferred Pairings:

Pork Beef Poultry Seafood Game
Apple x x x x
Almond x x x x
Bourbon Barrel x x x x
Cherry x x
Hickory x x
Maple x x
Mesquite x x x
Oak x
Orange x x x x
Peach x x
Walnut x x

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